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Royal Mail Valuables definition updates from 2nd January 2020

By Chris Dawson November 26, 2019 - 11:30 am

From the 2nd January 2020, what Royal Mail Valuables are defined as in their General Terms & Conditions is changing. It’s important to note that contents defined as valuable can only be sent using Royal Mail Special Delivery Guaranteed products.

In some ways it appears that the changes give senders more leeway for low cost items as Royal Mail Valuables are now defined as items worth more than £100 for jewellery and watches. An addition to the list of valuables is bullion.

Royal Mail advise that you check the updated list as it remains the senders responsibility to ensure the correct products are used.

Royal Mail Valuables definition changes from 2nd January 2020

From

To

jewellery (including, diamonds and precious stones) jewellery (including, diamonds and precious stones) with a retail value of greater than £100
watches (the cases of which are made totally or mainly of precious metal) watches with a retail value of greater than £100

any precious metal that has been made to add value to the raw material (including coins used for ornament) any precious metal that has been made to add value to the raw material (including coins used for ornament) with a retail value of greater than £100
articles similar to any of those referred to in (a) – (c) above with an intrinsic value articles similar to any of those referred to in (a) – (c) above with an intrinsic value
any similar articles with a value other than the value of the workmanship any similar articles with a value other than the value of the workmanship
money (including, tickets, coins (of any currency), bank notes (of any currency), postal orders, cheques; unused postage and revenue stamps and National Insurance stamps; exchequer bills, bills of exchange, promissory notes and credit notes; bonds, coupons and other investment certificates; and coupons, vouchers, tokens, cards, stamps and other documents that can be exchanged for money, goods or services, dividend warrants uncrossed and payable to bearer or bond coupons) money (including, coins (of any currency), bank notes (of any currency), bullion, postal orders, cheques; unused postage and revenue stamps and National Insurance stamps; exchequer bills, bills of exchange, promissory notes and credit notes; bonds, coupons and other investment certificates; and coupons, vouchers, transferable tickets, tokens, cards, stamps and other documents that can be exchanged for money, goods or services, dividend warrants uncrossed and payable to bearer or bond coupons)
  • 6 months ago

    National Insurance stamps? Surely not.

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