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Royal Mail hit targets but still face threat of strikes

By Chris Dawson August 29, 2017 - 11:06 am

Royal Mail have had a good start to their year hitting both their First and Second Class posting targets, although narrowly missing the target for Special Delivery.

The regulatory First Class mail target of 93% was exceeded with 93.3% of mail delivered by the next working day and the Second Class mail target of 98.5% achieved with 98.7% of mail delivered within three working days. The Special Delivery target of 99% was narrowly missed with 98.6% delivered but this target does not include businesses customers of Royal Mail buying the service using their account.

Royal Mail is still the only UK mail delivery company required to publish Quality of Service performance against delivery targets every quarter and has the highest Quality of Service specification of any major European country.

“Royal Mail operates under some of the most demanding Quality of Service standards in the whole of Europe, so it is only right to pay tribute to the hardworking postmen and women who make this happen six days a week at more than 30 million addresses across the UK. We remain the only UK delivery company to publish our Quality of Service performance and we are proud to do so.”
– Sue Whalley, Chief Operations Officer, Royal Mail

The only real blot on Royal Mail’s horizon is the continuing threat of strikes by the CWU. We understand that the latest deadline giving is the 6th of September before the CWU consider scheduling stike action if sufficient progress hasn’t been made in talks with Royal Mail.

The last full scale strike by Royal Mail workers was called by the CWU back in 2009 and the last time they almost came to strike action was 2013. Since privatisation, Moya Greene Royal Mail’s Chief Executive has managed to keep the unions in check and the post moving.

It’s notable that in year’s past the CWU arranged postal strikes every two years around Christmas time. It was only in 2009 that the public grew tired of union petulance and for the first time didn’t generally appear to support strike action. Times changed and people just wanted their Christmas cards and presents delivered and today with low or no pay rises for most workers in both the public and private sector I’d be willing to bet that generally there’s little appetite for a postal strike outside the union and possibly even within it.

  • 2 months ago

    I think you will find a very big appetite for strike action. Pay cut, increase in workload, change in hours (two hours later) and pensions stolen. While the company made 712 million profit.

    • Colin
      2 months ago

      I’m a postie with just four year service, I joined Royal Mail expecting to work for a 500 year old institution that would provide me with sound and sturdy strong managerial influence. How wrong I was!
      The company does not value its front line staff at all, they employ new starters on 25 hour contracts when there is no 25 hour jobs within the front line business. RM them expects these individuals to work in excess of 50 hours a week.
      This is just a cop out, RM saves a fortune in employing staff on low hours contracts and expecting full time hours (pension, holiday pay, sickness pay etc.)
      RM you are a service industry that relies on your staff especially front line delivery staff, you are making vast profits, invest in your staff and stop comparing us to ‘lifestyle couriers’ when trying to justify why we are not worthy of the pay and benefits that we deserve. This is derogatory and insulting.
      All this said I am proud to work for Royal Mail but I feel that I am let down by a very very poor management structure.
      A company the size of RM should have achieved ‘investors in people’ status, the individuals who work there work damm hard but are let down by an archaic management structure which is why IIP status will never be achieved under the current regime.

  • Adam
    2 months ago

    I hate to say it but I’m a posty of 27 years and a job I was proud of but not now
    The unrealistic targets the managers put on its workers are just silly now and I won’t be long before I will be forced to leave one of the last great British companies
    Our walks are 13 miles a day in all weather and it just to much for many of us.
    The sad fact is all I ever here is ( why is my post so late) of people and it seems the public blames us for this sad fact , the fact is we all preferred early mornings finishing at 12 just like our customers want but the management want later finishes not ealyier
    And guess who people will blame, the poor postie

  • Mark
    2 months ago

    Chris you seem to have a bit of an axe to grind with postal workers. Not happy with the service you received during your eBay empire building ? You write of Moya Greene keeping the unions in check and of their petulance and speculate of lack of public support. Do you not like to see workers exercise their democratic right (and through democratic means i.e. voting) to push for improvements in their pay and condititions ? Strike action after all is a last resort and comes only after negotiations have failed. Workers do not receive pay during strike action so therefore are loathe to take it.

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