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100 Free eBay auctions 12th/13th October

By Chris Dawson October 12, 2013 - 6:09 am

eBay 12th 13th October promoeBay are running a free listing weekend again. On the 12th and 13th of October private sellers can list up to 100 items on auction with a start price of £1 or more for free.

All the normal rules apply – you must be a UK registered private seller and meet the minimum selling standards. Business sellers and PowerSellers are excluded.

What is interesting about this promotion is that there’s no mention of using professional listing tools. On previous promotions use of tools such as TurboLister have been specifically banned and only the Sell Your Item forms or eBay mobile apps would qualify you for free fees. If you do decide to list with a professional tool we’d strongly recommend that you list one or two items only to check you qualify for the discounted fees before sticking up 100 items.

Christmas is coming, time to have a clear out of all last year’s no longer wanted gadgets and get some cash in your personal PayPal account ready to spend.

Full details are as always on the .

  • Tony
    3 years ago

    Mine appears to have given me 200 free listings in my promotional area.

    • JD
      3 years ago

      When the announcement was first made it said 200 in all the small print which was later reined back to 100.

      Muppets forgot the master switch perhaps?

    • 3 years ago

      Its definitely accepted over 100 and working steadily towards 200.

    • Tony
      3 years ago

      I chatted with eBay and they say it was a mistake and any over 100 will be charged for. They told me not to go over 100 listings.

    • JD
      3 years ago

      eBay seem to be going to great lengths to upset just about anybody and everybody.

      Or perhaps sleight of hand is the only way to get fees out of private sellers these days.

      Fantastic customer relations!

    • northumbrian
      3 years ago

      were hobby sellers too we love collecting
      tax bills lol
      we dont resent anyone making money its when they complain because their breads not buttered thick enough that becomes annoying

  • 3 years ago

    I continued to list until it started to charge. Adding them up it accepted 200. If it was a mistake then its ebays mistake and they should accept it as such.

    Mind you it is just as much their mistake as all the restrictions I suffered last year after I was targeted by a Fraud and ebay backed the fraudster to the hilt.

    • Tony
      3 years ago

      I’m tempted to do the same and use all 200 listings but having been told in a chat with them that I would be subsequently charged, I’m not sure I want to risk it. I agree with you Chris that its their mistake so they should bear it but you know how greedy ebay are these days, now taking 10% of your postage and packing charge for a service they do not provide!

  • 3 years ago

    As a matter of interest Why is ebay removing standard photographs from the Books files. It appears to me that all of the standard photographs of books that come up as 2 black book shapes are where ebay or somebody working with ebay has removed the photo of a book that was previously there. It does appear that as ebay is requiring more and better photographs ebay is removing the standard photos. Why?

    Some are possibly because of problems with the photo. As an example one I saw is a Book on Irish Railways. The cover is green but the ebay photo was a yellow ochre colour. That has gone. So it could be that others have been deleted for similar reasons. But what with the high proportion of Books where there are technical details but no photos and those where ebay has removed the previous photo it means that probably less than 50% of book titles has a standard photo. Yet ebay is demanding photos in all cases.

    Also why is no effort being put into catching up. There are many thousands of books published years ago where there is nothing available when you tap in the ISBN. No Technicals, no Photo nothing. But 2013 publications are not much better. Many books published in the early months of 2013 still have no technicals or photos. Surely these are the very Books that ebay should be catering for?

  • northumbrian
    3 years ago

    why would any genuine private seller ever need more than 100 listings anyhow?

    • Tony
      3 years ago

      Not sure why you think they shouldn’t. I am a private seller and I have more than 100 things I want to sell.

    • northumbrian
      3 years ago

      if it looks like a duck. ,and walks like a duck ,its a duck!
      and if your selling for gain and profit regularly its a business

    • Tony
      3 years ago

      Getting off topic really. Interesting definition of a business. Clearly you are a business seller and resent private individuals trying to make a little extra money to top up their meagre incomes. I cannot see why you think that regular private sellers are a business – I am certainly not a business and do not make very much money at all on eBay – it is more a hobby to sell duplicate items or unwanted items so that I can use the money to buy other items for my collections – that does not make me a business.

    • 3 years ago

      It really depends on HMRC’s view of how long you’ve owned the items. If you regular buy things this month and sell them next month then they’ll definitely class you as a business.

      If you bought stuff a decade ago and no longer want it they’ll probably treat you as a private seller.

      If it’s somewhere in the middle it’s down to you and HMRC to argue the case when/if they ask why you’re making so much money from eBay sales.

    • 3 years ago

      I like the concept of making so much money from ebay sales. However years ago when I was regularly attending Traction Engine Rallies with my sales stand I would sell as much in a 2 day weekend event as I do now in a month on ebay with probably considerably less expences and the advantage that I could enjoy the event as well.

      I only wish I could still be attending Rallies but my lung problems combined with my lower back problems make that impossible.

      When I had to give up Rallies I had considerable stocks. Bit by bit I am reducing those stocks. But it is going to take years and of some titles I will never get rid of the last. I just will not live long enough.

      So if the definition of Business / Private is based on Profit then I am clearly Private.

      Every year I think about doing the Rallies again. I still have my Sales Stand packed up in the back of the garden shed. I could get it out again but it would not be sensible for me to try as I know that to try to set up the stall would probably put me in Hospital.

      After all a good Rally Season should enable me to get rid of a great deal of stock. The season starts about Easter and goes on until the end of September(or just into October). Thats about about 25 Weekends and selling as much in a weekend as I currently do on ebay plus continuing to sell on ebay would make serious inroads into the stock.

    • Tony
      3 years ago

      Northumbrian – I get your point but I wasn’t complaining – I was highlighting an issue at eBay where they have made a mistake that could cost private sellers a fortune if they go over 100 listings to 200, that’s all.

    • northumbrian
      3 years ago

      tony we get your point also . ebay needs to be less slap happy,
      though we have no sympathy with a “private seller “who lists 200 items plus being charged a fee and if I were HMRC we would be asking ebay to give us the details of those that do

    • Tony
      3 years ago

      I don’t have a job – my ebay income such as it is is well below the tax threshold for paying tax. You seem to think quantity is intricately linked to status – if that is the case then there are millions of “businesses” on eBay all earning well under the tax threshold and therefore of no interest to HMRC anyway. You keep using inverted commas to say private sellers – clearly you don’t understand what a private seller is if you think that a private individual cannot possibly have 100 things they want to sell, or have to sell in many cases to make ends meet. I wasn’t asking for sympathy about being charged fees – I pay my fees like everyone else – the thread of this posting was that the system claimed 100 listings were free but as it turns out it is indeed 200 as I got confirmed by eBay last night.

    • northumbrian
      3 years ago

      quantity is linked to status! if your selling quantity regularly for profit or reward, your a “business” not “private”, tax threshold is another matter entirely!

    • Gary
      3 years ago

      Selling on ebay affects state handouts/benefits as well as tax. So whether you are selling in quantity for gain below the tax threshold or selling to make ends meet, in which case you will be on state handouts, the honest taxpayer is being ripped off if a declaration is not made.

      ebay should pass on the names and addresses of all private sellers who take advantage of the full free listing limit for any promotion that they do to HMRC. And ebay should declare that they will do this. Let there be some honesty and openness about this. Let HMRC decide who is “private” and who is not.

      Honest private sellers have nothing to fear.

    • Gary
      3 years ago

      If you are a private seller selling collectables purchased many years ago then you may be liable for capital gains tax. In any case a declaration one way or the other should be made to cover yourself from any future tax liability.

      Else the taxman might simply declare the extra money as “income” rather than “capital gains” in which case income tax may need to be paid or a return of state benefits has to be made and the capital gains allowance of £11000 (or whatever) has been wasted.

      Of course private sellers don’t sell to make a profit.

    • 3 years ago

      I would always advise everybody who sells on ebay to keep full records of what they do both on the Income and Expenditure sides of the Accounts. I know that I do and I declare everything to HMRC.

      I have a poor memory so if somebody asked me about a transaction that happened say 12 months ago there is no chance of me remembering. But if I keep full records I can look it up and see what happened. Also keep all invoices, receipts, etc and file them in with the accounts. I know I do so if ever HMRC was wanting to check them out they are all filed. My files go back years.

      So if ebay did give HMRC my details(although as HMRC already has all the information although it could be a case of different Offices dealing with it) I have everything available to keep them happy.

      Even if you are selling the childrens old toys I would argue that you should keep records.

  • Tony
    3 years ago

    Just had abnother chat with ebay and they confirm that it is to be 200 listings despite what the announcement says. They assure me I can list up to 200 without fees

    • JD
      3 years ago

      And quite right too!

      Anyone/body that cocks up should do the right thing.

  • Tony
    3 years ago

    So the assumption is that because I don’t have a job I am on benefits. Wrong! I do not receive a penny in benefits whatsoever nor am I registered as unemployed so not even national insurance is being paid on my behalf. My partner is the breadwinner, I am the house-husband. I am a private seller, not a business, and that’s that.

    • northumbrian
      3 years ago

      who earns the most in the household is not the criteria for private or business status

    • northumbrian
      3 years ago

      were a business, were not saints, we duck and dive, same as anyone else ,to make a living ,though we dont delude ourselves or suffer denial

  • Gary
    3 years ago

    If you are selling unwanted household items that were purchased new then you would be a private seller. Any other category of sales including hobby items purchased recently duplicates or otherwise then you are a business. The excuse that profits made on ebay cover hobby costs is no excuse. If items are being sold for profit then that makes it a business.

    Absolutely no one has 200 unwanted household items. And the fact that Chris T keeps listing the same books again and again and has sold these in the past at steam train rallies suggests nothing other than business. The excuse that the books are specialised and it can take years to find the right buyer is no excuse and only goes to reaffirm that Chris T is a business as he is happy to keep books in storage forever in the hope of achieving a price higher than that paid.

    • 3 years ago

      I can only wonder what planet Gary Lives on. “Absolutely no one has 200 unwanted household items”. Every year thousands, possibly hundreds of thousands of people in the UK “Downsize”.

      They have brought up their family. The children have left home and now Mr & Mrs Smith are rattling around in the old family home. The decide to sell the large family home and move to a small bungalow or maybe a Retirement Flat. They cannot take everything with them so start to sell the many hundreds, possibly thousands, possibly tens of thousands of items that they have accumulated through their lives.

      Then there are others who are just moving house and also have the opportunity to check out everything they have accumulated. What about those who are emigrating? They also often have a lot of items to get rid off.

      These categories and several others would not be impressed by some clown telling them that they cannot possibly have more than 200 household items to get rid off.

  • mw
    3 years ago

    I think HMRC are clear as to what constitiutes a business based transaction – they define it as anything that was bought with the intent to sell it on at a later date. They make no mention of time scale, nor do they mention condition, it seems to make no difference if that is sold as new or as used (because you watched the DVD for example). It’s the original intent that counts and whilst on it’s own a single item can be argued as a private transaction. A history of such selling cannot so easily be argued – and both ebay & Paypal keep those records which HMRC would scrutinise for a minimum of 7 years. My view, if in doubt you should declare it to HMRC and let them decide.

    • 3 years ago

      There are many on ebay who are selling such as the Childrens old toys or secondhand clothes. Before we all get worked up we should remember the basic transaction Sales Price less Original Purchase Price less any expences equals the Profit or Loss on the transaction.

      Before some start jumping up and down and demanding that HMRC spends a great deal of time scrutinising all Private Sellers we should remember that on that basis many of the Private Sellers are making a Loss.

      They have the Clothes that the child has grown out of, or the toys that they no longer play with that were originally bought for £x. They intend to sell them for whatever and then spend the money on such as larger clothes that will fit the child now.

      Do we really want HMRC to spend all its time on such transactions?

      Even Collectibles can fall into the same situation. I have a modest collection of Model Buses. Some I buy have their original price label on them. Say £19-99 and I have bought them via an ebay auction at say £5-95. Do we really want HMRC to spend thousands of scarce man-hours analysing such transactions?

      I have been told that I make a profit on everything I sell. Wrong. I am an enthusiast. I could bundle everything up and take it to the dump or to recycling. Indeed I have taken some items that have been damaged in store to recycling.

      However I am an enthusoast I would be very happy to get most of my money back or even make a loss if the Books go to a Good Home.

      It is true that some I do make a profit on but this is certainly not all of them. Probably not more than about one third of the items.

    • 3 years ago

      The difference between someone selling their kids second hand toys and you, is that you’ve stated in the past that your “stock” is ex stock left over from your business, i.e. it was “bought to sell”.

      “Buying to sell” is the only definition of “a business” that HMRC are interested in. Quite frankly they don’t care if a business makes a massive loss, they just expect the business to state the loss on their tax returns.

      Please don’t advise people that they’re not a business just because they don’t make a profit. They’ll only get fined for not registering their business even if no tax is due.

      Also if they have other taxable income (e.g. a salary), they may actually be able to offset their losses against their other income and pay less overall tax!!

    • 3 years ago

      I don’t think that I have ever advised anybody that they are not a business if they are selling regularly. Indeed as I have said several times I keep full records of what I have done and I submit full details to HMRC.

      Obviously there are many ways of selling ebay and similar are just one type of selling. There are still corner and village shops with windows that you can advertise in and of course Car Boot Sales. So if you are regularly selling I would always advise keeping full records and if it starts to grow to a reasonable extent then notify HMRC.

      HMRC will not be interested if you are only selling £50 or so a year of old clothes and toys. But they will be if it grows to thousands of pounds per annum, especially if you are obviously doing it as a business in addition to your normal employment.

    • 3 years ago

      You’re blurring the lines talking about “profit” and “loss” for private sellers and “HMRC will not be interested if you are only selling £50 or so a year of old clothes and toys”.

      Private sellers don’t make “profit” or “loss”, they make pocket money from unwanted possessions.

      HMRC will definitely be interested in you if you are “only selling £50 or so a year of old clothes and toys”… if you’re buying to sell. The amount is irrelevant. All that matters is are you a business with “stock” (even if from an ex-business) or are you disposing of unwanted genuinely personal possessions.

    • northumbrian
      3 years ago

      what bemuses us is the these “private sellers” who are not really “private sellers! having the cheek to squark not fair at ebay

    • 3 years ago

      I must have said several times I keep full records of everything that I do and I make a full declaration to HMRC. I don’t think I can make it any clearer. As I have been making declarations for over 30 years to HMRC I think that my file must be quite large by now and it has covered all of the changes of circumstances such as my health problems which have had a significant impact on my turnover over the years.

      By selling £50 a year I meant the person who is selling off the childrens old clothes and toys. Obviously it is highly unlikely that there is anybody in the UK who is buying and selling as a business who only has an annual turnover of £50 per annum(£1 per week?)

      As soon as the situation changes and you start to buy and sell as a business you should contact the HMRC and regularise your position. But to be achieving any sort of results you will be selling a lot more than just the childrens old clothes and toys.

    • mw
      3 years ago

      From what I can tell (because our tax liability return on line was instant) by filling in an online tax returns it’s mainly automated. It may well only be viewed by a human if the automated system flagged it up or it’s randomly selected for accuracy review.
      And I would agree that proven business losses may be offset-against total household income – it’s worth asking HMRC.

    • Jimbo
      3 years ago

      “Do we really want HMRC to spend all its time on such transactions?”. No we do it for them by filing our tax return and accounts.

  • Gary
    3 years ago

    So there is now an admission that at least one private seller is not a private seller as records are kept.

    So why trade on ebay as a private seller to take advantage of the occasional 100 x 5p = £5 free listing offer with all the work this entails? You would be much better off overall fee wise registering as a business.

    Lower final value fees and 200 free BIN listings if you have an ebay shop costing £20 per month. 200 x 5p x 3 (30days/10days) = £30 which is £10 more than the £20 cost of a shop. And you only have to list once until the item is sold.

    Free listings are not guaranteed every fortnight and so your item disappear to be relisted every so often A permanent presence provides stabibility and credibility and will increase sales.

    Did you not realise that?

    • radroach
      3 years ago

      It’s not as simple a comparison as that – auctions get significantly better visibility on eBay than do fixed price listings (making a sale more likely) and there is always a chance of competitive bidding, even on items which have been listed before.

    • Gary
      3 years ago

      You don’t get competitive bidding if your start price is inflated in the first place. Why do you think so many private sellers list the same 100 things over and over again. They live in hope but in reality waste time. Weekends are for living not for recycling the same old gear time and time again on ebay.

      Actually thinking about they can’t possibly be business sellers. Anybody who does this has to be an amateur (definition – activity for pleasure rather than for financial benefit or professional reasons).

    • 3 years ago

      It would be very simple to list everything at 99p working on the basis that competitive bidding with always raise the price to a realistic level. I don’t know if you have tried this? In reality it means that many, probably the vast majority sell at 99p even if they have a realistic value of £10.00.

      So I would always advocate that the price listed is realistic. So if it is worth £10 then start perhaps at £9-50 and hope it rises to £10. But I will agree that it is a waste of everybodies time to list at £10 if it is only worth £9.

      However just because it goes through the sausage machine last time without generating any interest does not mean that it will sell the next time through. I have had many items that have failed to sell with no interest. Yet the next time two potential purchasers have a good fight over it and it sells for way over my listing price. That after all is a characteristic of Auctions.

    • 3 years ago

      I do not believe that anybody could sensibly define Business Seller as Keeping Records and Private Seller as Does not keep records. To my way of thinking EVERYBODY should keep records. Why? Well to start with it is far easier to explain what you have been doing if you have records of it. So if you are selling the childrens old clothes and toys you have the details of what you sold and when and to whom. If you are keeping records then this should be obvious.

    • 3 years ago

      If you’re a private seller you would have no need of records. Quite frankly who cares who little Jane’s old dress was sold to or where Jack’s battered fire engine went?

      Of course if selling “old clothes and toys” is offering the same garments in multiple sizes and practically or actually brand new, as some private sellers have on offer, then I’d say you’re a business.

      Quite frankly I don’t care if you’re a private seller or business seller, that’s down to you and HMRC to sort out. However keeping “Records” and talking about “Profit”, “Realistic selling prices” and having “Stock left over from my business” does sound like a business.

      There’s also a very real distinction between a private seller and a business seller who doesn’t make enough profit to pay tax. The latter is still a business!

    • 3 years ago

      I disagree. If you keep records then if any questions arise in the future you can look back on what you were doing. The records do not have to be extensive but should provide the basic information. This is probably very important if private selling of the childrens old toys and clothes over a period of years did develop into a business and HMRC was trying to decide when you became a business.

      Every year we see reports stating that women have bought numerous garments that they have not subsequently worn or only worn once or twice(most men I know tend to buy fewer items and wear them much longer and often to destruction).

      So a woman selling on ebay as a Private Seller could genuinely be selling New or almost New garments from their own Wardrobe. Indeed thinking about how most women seem to spend their lives on diets they could be selling such items in various sizes.

      Fashion tends to be important to women more than men. So it is probable that as soon as an item goes out of fashion some women may be listing them on ebay.

    • 3 years ago

      Realistic Selling Price should be important to every seller whether they are Private or Business. Nobody likes giving items away for less than they are worth.

      After all whether you are selling to raise the money to pay for the childrens Christmas Presents or to develop the business we all like to think that we have obtained a fair price for what we have on sale.

  • paddy
    3 years ago

    This thread feels like a discussion on one of the Ebay boards. Just waiting for the “Are you really a business” gif to appear.

  • northumbrian
    3 years ago

    the moderators are so bad on this board they fly a red flag

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