Share:
POST
TWEET
SHARE
SHARE
EMAIL

Novelty bank notes, Ivory, laser pointers: Banned on eBay

By Chris Dawson October 21, 2008 - 11:20 am

eBay have announced this morning three new sets of products which are banned on eBay. In truth these products are not able to be sold legally in the UK so it’s not great loss.

It’s a criminal offence to produce novelty bank notes resembling British currency and from the 27th October these will be covered under the eBay Counterfeit Currency and Stamps policy. Ivory is a contentious issue as there are a few exceptions where it can be legally sold but eBay are prohibiting all sales of Ivory to prevent unscrupulous dealers from falsely claiming their items were legal antiques. There are already guidelines in force for the sale of laser pointers and eBay are merely mirroring these guideline on the site and they’ll now be covered by the Hazardous Materials policy

For most sellers it’s business as usual, for those whose products are affected it’s worth checking 30 day and Good-til-canceled listings to ensure they’re ended prior to the bans being enforced.

  • northumbrian
    11 years ago

    yet ebay still sell large amounts of Whisky

  • Uncle Sam
    11 years ago

    #1 Along with “to comply with eBay rules the Item for sale is for an addition to a collection only and therefore for display and collection purposes, any contents which are truly incidental to the sale are deemed to be of no value and are not really meant for consumption.”

    So why not pour it down the sink before you list the bottle?

  • 11 years ago

    Well, thats my Xmas sales kernackered then !

    I have enroute from China 5000 luxury laser pointers, each in an ivory presentation case, and was offering a novelty bank note with each purchase to show how you can burn a hole in yer money 😎

    All I need now is for eBay to ban ‘musical personal massagers’, and I will be in real trouble!

  • 11 years ago

    Uncle Sam asks:
    “So why not pour it down the sink before you list the bottle?”

    If I am selling a 100 year old bottle, I don’t want to destroy the originality of the bottle by destroying the seal. I do have a pair of sample wine bottles here that are about 70 years old, the contents would not be drinkable but they are still full, and thus while I am not selling the contents it would be a shame to break them open and destroy something that has been preserved in it’s original form for all of that time.

    Kevin (who doesn’t drink, just appreciates the historic aspects of old original items)

  • FenLex
    11 years ago

    Inspired, Eddie, inspired!

    Kevin: I don’t doubt your own motives but the problem as ever is the scope for abuse and the difficulty of policing. The line of least resistance is always to leave things be, let them get out of hand and end up having to ban the lot.

  • 11 years ago

    #4 to add to which, the fact of the sealed unopened contents adds to the value – nobody would want to destroy most of the value of their collectable by opening and drinking it!

  • northumbrian
    11 years ago

    6
    No one that is ,other than someone that is buying the item for its contents! and can get alcohol delivered direct to their door

  • 11 years ago

    #6 err Hello! Thats not strictly true. Empty scotch bottles are great.

    😆

  • Super Max
    11 years ago

    It must be a pretty dangerous hobby collecting whisky bottles, you could easily get drunk one night, start opening them and decimate the value of your collection.

  • northumbrian
    11 years ago

    So in theory we could list a Sub Machine gun or two just bung an uZi in a ming vase

    😈 The value of the listed item is in the collectable container, not its contents.

    The listing description should state that the container has not been opened, but that any incidental contents are not intended 😈 TO KILL YOU 😈

    The item must not be available at any retail outlet, and the container must have a value that substantially exceeds the current retail price of the 😈 WEAPON 😈 in the container.

    Sellers should take steps to ensure that the buyer of these collectables is of lawful age in the buyer and seller’s jurisdiction (generally 18 years old in the UK and Republic of Ireland, 21 years old in the US).

    Buyers and sellers must ensure that the sale complies with all applicable laws and delivery regulations in carrying out the transaction.

Featured in this article from the Tamebay Guide – companies that can help you grow and manage your business.

See More Companies >

Recent Comments

2 hours ago
Derek Duval: @Dav In my opinion the only reason they Ebay more adverts on the site is so...
3 hours ago
Jim: Must be a direct link to the asylum Is the only explanation...
4 hours ago
Dav: I'm also done with this thread. It's pretty clear a couple of you are always...
4 hours ago
Dav: You're not looking at the big picture. Just because something's listed on eBay doesn't mean...