eBay’s policy recommendations for TTIP

TTIP is a trade agreement that’s currently being negotiated between the EU and the US. The idea is that it will grease the wheels for international trade. We’ll doubtless see how it pans out in due course.

Of course, the deal is controversial and incomplete, but I do like the inputs eBay Inc. has made to the process. And eBay is in a unique place to take a stand on this one.

It’s very reliance on cross-border trade by SMEs gives it a solid position for advocacy. It’s good to see the guys there using that standpoint to argue for positive changes to what could be a very important bit of international law.

I’ll be interested to see if these recommendations are incorporated in the final treaty. Because they are good ideas.

eBay has written about TTIP here and published their more detailed views in this document.

But here are the ideas eBay Inc. is lobbying on:

– Break new ground on customs relief thresholds by introducing a baseline threshold of the equivalent to USD 800, index-linked, and regardless of the country of origin.
– Exempt returns from customs duties
– Support cross-border parcel delivery services through harmonised standards and formats for postal services; tracking and data interoperability between postal and delivery operators.
– Become a platform for developing trusted trader schemes adapted to micro and small firms, where the different exporting profile of technology-enabled businesses is correctly accounted for within customs risk assessment.
– Provide for transatlantic consumer rights by applying the idea behind the proposed Common European Sales Law (i.e. simplifying cross-border life of firms and consumers through an optional and non-national law) to transatlantic trade.
– Support omnichannel trade by addressing mobile roaming across the Atlantic: travelling consumers should be able to use their smartphones effectively so that retailers can engage with visiting consumers effectively.